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Scope mounting problems

Moderator: Repairman


.22LR
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2014 11:51 am
Location: Edmonds, WA
PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:49 am
I had the same thought. I could see using the technique on guns that fire ball projectiles but thought it would distort a longer bullet and produce fliers. That doesn't seem to be the case however. Either the bend is shallow enough the bullet isn't affected or it has time to return to its original shape prior to leaving the muzzle. On the other hand maybe there isn't that much of the bullet actually in contact with the rifling. Regardless they'll always be a burr under my saddle with regards to this rifle. It might work but it ain't right.

.22LR
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2014 11:51 am
Location: Edmonds, WA
PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 9:46 pm
Back on September 30th I mailed off a letter to Remington describing my 750, the issue and the 'fix'. In my experience with the corporate world it is not uncommon for production problems such as this to never be brought to management's attention. I received no response.

I read Remington has been laying off more workers at their Ilion, NY plant. On top of the 105 employees let go in August they announced another 126 in mid-November.

MW

.22LR
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2014 11:51 am
Location: Edmonds, WA
PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 5:01 pm
There's another leg to the original scope mounting problem. I couldn't get the rear screw on the bracket to tighten and had to take the rifle to a gunsmith. He said the original threads were probably cut with an overly dull tap and were so poorly defined as to be useless. He re-tapped all four with the next oversize to get a firm hold. I'll probably just use the scope on another rifle as I doubt this will see the light very often. Sad.
User avatar
.270 WIN
Posts: 246
Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2014 7:13 pm
Location: Indiana
PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 8:39 pm
willism wrote:There's another leg to the original scope mounting problem. I couldn't get the rear screw on the bracket to tighten and had to take the rifle to a gunsmith. He said the original threads were probably cut with an overly dull tap and were so poorly defined as to be useless. He re-tapped all four with the next oversize to get a firm hold. I'll probably just use the scope on another rifle as I doubt this will see the light very often. Sad.

He could have drilled and tapped it for a helicoil. At least that way if it would ever strip out again, you could just install another helicoil.
USMC 83' - 87'
NRA Member
Indiana & Utah CCW

Are we there yet?

Copper BB
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2015 1:27 pm
PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 3:52 pm
Had same exact problem with my 750 autoloader in .270 Winchester calibre.

Noted during Vortex Hoghunter Scope installation boresight that the scope adjustability was way, way, way too far off in elevation to be adjusted.

Measured centerline (bore) of barrel and top of receiver alignment and noted the downward projection of the laser beam. Mine measured about 3/16th inch off.

Promptly called Remington for RMA and shipped the rifle back. Got rifle back within 3 weeks and it had a new receiver installed. The receiver swap out corrected the issue. If you look at the illustrated parts list you will see that the new 750's have a bolt which hold the receiver to the barrel. This bolt faces forward (head toward rear stock). If this is not installed correctly or the barrel mounting tang is not aligned, well you get these kind of conditions.

My problem is that there are way too many complaints about his for me not to mention "quality control" problems, especially on a firearm.

All in all my 750 shoots well, carries easy and Remington did repair it without charge (including two shipping). It is also noteworthy that this is the first of eight Remington's I own that ever had any problems (other than the Factory trigger recall on my Rem 600).

The forum research revealed problems from mis-feeds, poor ejection and magazines either falling out or not locking properly during insertion. The 750 autoloader should be tweaked by all who own it. I took care of all my problems (yes, all those mentioned) with a small pair of needle nose pliers, a little TLC, good cleaning and light oiling. This gun definitely need to have a few boxes of ammo put through it prior to that long awaited hunt in order to identify any issues that need correction.

Make sure you periodically clean the orifice into the barrel w/ small tubular nylon brush or pipe cleaner. Nothing is mentioned in the owners manual however on the bottom of the barrel there is a gas system block that has a set screw. Remove setscrew and steel ball, clean orifice and reassemble.

My final comments are about adding shims. Burris makes a fine set of scope rings (Signature Series) that come with matching shims (.001 and .002) for minor changes for both weaver and picatinny mounting rail styles. Anything that is 3/16th or 5/32nd of an inch off is not right to begin with. Shimming is not the answer. RMA is the proper route. Let the manufacturer confirm and correct the issue.
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